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President’s Message

November 2023 President’s Report

November 2023 President’s Report

Organizing and Political Activism

ASA Negotiations –

 Thank you to everyone who took the time to fill out the ASA survey. We held a L665 Town Hall meeting on Thursday, November 9th regarding member priorities for the ASA negotiations. Nearly 60 members participated in the town hall. It’s imperative that we get member input on contract language for the areas of work that we cover. We met with International Vice President Mike Miller this past Friday to discuss the rough draft of the proposals based on the notes I took at the town hall meeting. Many of the proposals are a matter of swapping “this” for “that”. Other matters will require more attention – Ocean Work vs Pool work, Boomlift operators, etc. And we’ll be reaching out to members who have pertinent experience in these areas to help us craft the proposal language. The only major concern he had was the language we’re considering for Appendix B – Dues. Some of the issues will require a conversation with IA Legal. Again, not every proposal will make it through the process, but we’re gonna fight the good fight nonetheless.

Production Workers Guild –

The IA has organized the following crafts under the AICP – Production Assistants, Assistant Production Supervisors, Production Supervisors, Line Producers, and Bidding Producers working freelance in commercial production under the AICP. Their organizing drive offers a reduced initiation fee. If you know anyone that has worked in these crafts, please share the following information:

Website – https://www.pwg111.org

IG: https://www.instagram.com/productionworkersguild/

Online application for membership: https://web.miniextensions.com/FTYfA63H8t7QrlP7jQTX

Applications for this organizing drive are open until January 11th, 2024

Legislative – 

I attended the legislative priorities meeting with the State Fed on November 7th at 10 am. The meeting summarized the legislative priorities of all affiliate unions. The vast majority of these priorities are industry-specific to the individual affiliate unions. Additionally, I attended the Democratic Party of Hawai’i’s Labor Caucus legislative priority meeting later that evening at 630 pm. This meeting was to discuss the ways in which we can support the working families of Hawai’i. The main priorities of the Labor Caucus in this next session is to fix the loopholes in Hawai’i’s minimum wage laws that prevent tipped wage workers from receiving a living wage and to remove the state income tax on unemployment insurance. If you know anyone that is or ever been in the restaurant industry, or if you’ve ever filed for unemployment, you know why these are priorities

As we head into the legislative session next January, both meetings were in consensus that much of the discussions regarding funding at the legislature will be about Maui relief. That being said, we need to ensure that the film tax incentive is, at worst, safeguarded and, at best, strengthened. We will not only advocate for our goals, but also the goals of the greater labor ‘ohana. It’s our duty to stand up for organized labor and for the working families of Hawai’i. The way we do that is by being active politically and legislatively. Start getting familiar with this process now so that you don’t have to scramble to figure it out when the clock starts ticking.

Political activism means participating in elections. There are a lot of folks that will say that elections don’t matter, that Hawaii only has 4 electoral college votes, so why bother. If elections weren’t important, there wouldn’t be groups spending millions upon millions of dollars trying to exclude people from voting. Your county councilmember, your state representative, and your state senator will be supporting, opposing, and voting on things that affect your daily life – from zoning, to speed limits, and much, much more. Register to vote today by going to: https://olvr.hawaii.gov/.

Your state legislators sit on committees where they discuss, revue, and vote on the bills that might eventually become laws. Get familiar with your legislators and start looking at the types of bills that they introduce and how they vote on issues. The letter next to their names means less than the issues that they support and oppose. To find your legislator, go to: https://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/fyl/

Legislative activism means participating in the lawmaking process. We do this by actively submitting testimony in support or opposition to bills that are being considered by the county councils, the state house of representatives, the state senate, and federal representation. 

If you have not already done so, create an account at capitol.hawaii.gov. You cannot submit testimony if you don’t have an account.

Each county has its own set of rules for submitting testimony. Get informed about your county council, its members, and their voting history by visiting their websites:

Hawaii County Council – 

https://www.hawaiicounty.gov/our-county/legislative/county-council/attend-meetings-submit-testimony

Maui County Council – 

https://www.mauicounty.gov/159/Council-Meetings

Honolulu City Council – 

https://www.honolulucitycouncil.org/

Kaua’i County Council – 

https://www.kauai.gov/Government/Council

Good Jobs Challenge – 

November 1st – IA/UH CC program for GJC HI meeting with Carlos Cota, Dan’l Cook, and GJC staff on integrating “third party training” i.e. IA training into the UH CC curriculum system. This was the first meeting where we discussed how to incorporate IA training modules with the UH Community College (UHCC) curriculum system. We’re proposing baseline, foundational training modules to upskill new, current, and future members. Our goal is for this to be the pilot for an official apprenticeship program for Local 665 that can eventually be expanded to the Neighbor Islands.

Wednesday Nov 15th – Windward Community College/Paliku Theatre. I met with Nick Logue and Berkeley Spivey on Wednesday, Nov 15th. We toured the theatre and discussed gaps in their curriculum. Much of it consists of stage performance classes, but very little of it pertains to the technical side of live events. It’s a working theater and a prime candidate for an established training ground. It has a working fly system, LED lights, decent sound and light boards, a spot rail, grid, etc. They have been hungry for this type of training. As there are several members that live near there, there’s an opportunity to create the pilot training program (non-credit to start) where our new, current, and future members can acquire the skills necessary to operate efficiently in our industry by combining the skills and training courses we have access to with the infrastructure of the UH CC system. WCC is offering their infrastructure and their assistance in codifying our training into their system. There will be opportunities for our members to upskill themselves and still other opportunities for members to be the authorized trainers for these courses.

Thursday, Nov 16 – GJC Creative Industries Steering Committee Partnership – analyzing data report from SMS Consulting, a locally owned company specializing in spotting trends, pinpointing issues, and unlocking insights by combining the industry’s latest research and survey techniques with their insider knowledge of Hawai’i to give clients a comprehensive view of local issues. Here’s the meat of why showing up to these things matters – some of the talking points that I’ve made at these meetings have largely been new concepts that they haven’t considered. Now, those same talking points are woven into the fabric of their presentations. We are moving the needle more than we ever have in less time than ever before. Work in our industry hasn’t been cataloged officially in metrics that are used in workforce analysis. The county and the state are now monitoring the ways in which our work can positively affect the economy. 

Nov 17th GJC followup -Conversation with Marshall Norman of GJC HI, Nicolas Logue and Maria-Elena Diaz of Paliku Theatre and WCC, Liz Campos of the IATSE TTF, Thomas Chock and Rick Manayan of DBEDT, Carlos Cota and Dan’l Cook of the IA, to finalize “Third-Party Training Proposal” elements and create partnership with Paliku Theatre. We’re currently formulating a 6-week non-credit course certificate program that will lead directly to paid internships in Live Events and Tradeshows, and eventually into membership (for those who are not yet members). A non-credit course certificate would remove the requirements that normally apply to new college applicants (high school transcripts, SAT scores, etc).

To create an effective training program, we need experienced trainers to teach the current and next generations of workers. To our senior members, I’d like to express thanks for all the things that you’ve taught me in my journey. I’d like to suggest that we develop our senior members who are no longer fully active in the workforce to become certified as trainers for IA craft and safety courses. In this way, we can keep our senior members involved and pass on the many years of experience and knowledge to those that are just starting out and those that wish to upskill themselves. Keep it in the family, so to speak. I ask that our senior members consider taking the IA’s Train the Trainer courses so that we may empower our Local to be the most skilled theatrical technicians in the state. Especially for the curriculum involved, if there are enough of our members that have time to teach these courses, we can schedule a Train the Trainer course to take place here. This will specifically be for people who can commit to teaching at WCC late next spring/early next summer.

Workforce Development Council – 

Future of Work conference on October 27th at the Sheraton Waikiki – 

More than 300 stakeholders – employers, council members, state reps and senators, and more – in the realm of workforce development met in the Kaua’i Ballroom of the Sheraton Waikiki. The 6 hour conference highlighted reports regarding unemployment levels, forecasted employment levels for the next 3 years, training needs, and more. This comprehensive conference is a necessary step in analyzing the needs and trends of established and emerging job markets in Hawaii. By utilizing this data, we can prepare Hawai’i’s workforce for the available work ahead.

October 31st – WDC Executive Committee meeting 

WDC Chairs and Vice Chairs met to discuss the upcoming quarterly meeting, the various committee meetings, the agendas for all of them, and the mission and vision statement for the WDC, which is no small feat. I’m currently serving as the Vice Chair of the Sector Strategies and Career Pathways committee. I’m currently creating another presentation regarding “Tiger Teams” – deployable, rapid response support crews in times of emergencies, much like how our Maui members jumped in to help their community immediately after the fires. The focus will be on identifying county/state/federal certifications that will allow our members and their assets (i.e. tow plant generators, 4OT, spider boxes, PA systems, etc) to access disaster areas during an emergency as the community awaits aid and support from governmental and NGO agencies.

November 9th – Title I-IV huddle up for State Unified Plan

Each U.S. State and Territory submits a Unified or Combined State Plan to the U.S. Department of Labor and Department of Education that outlines its workforce development system’s four-year strategy, and updates the plan as required after two years. The deadline for finalizing the Hawaii State Unified Plan is March 4th, 2024. There are certain milestones that we need to meet along the timeline that are fast approaching and, to be honest, a little scary. But we have to get it done. Otherwise the state will lose out on $8 to $10 million in workforce development funds. The funds themselves originate from the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), which was signed into law on July 22, 2014. WIOA is designed to help job seekers access employment, education, training, and support services to succeed in the labor market and to match employers with the skilled workers they need to compete in the global economy. It is administered through the Department of Labor to state governments and then to county governments and entities. There are four separate “titles” that WIOA is designed to support that specifically relate to communities in our islands, our neighbors, and our family.

WIOA Title I authorizes programs and activities that support job training and related services to unemployed and underemployed individuals

WIOA Title II seeks to ensure that state and local service providers offer adult education and skills development programs that accelerate achievement of diplomas and credentials among American workers, including immigrants and individuals with limited English language skills

WIOA Title III amends the Wagner-Peyser Act of 1933, which authorizes the Employment Service (ES), to make the ES an integral part of the One-Stop system amended by WIOA

Incorporated as Title IV of WIOA, the Rehabilitation Act authorizes the formula grant programs of vocational rehabilitation, supported employment, and client assistance

I was scheduled to present before the council in mid November to educate them on the entertainment industry in Hawaii. The meeting has been rescheduled to November 28th, where I will give the presentation that I’ve been working on since September. As the work continues, I look forward to reporting on this endeavor.

SAG-AFTRA Tentative Agreement – Congrats to SAG-AFTRA for negotiating their TA. The strike is technically not over, it’s been suspended. The MOA still needs to be ratified. That being said, I wish the best of luck to everyone that’s gearing up to get back to work. Savor the last bits of time off. I have a feeling that things are about to get very interesting.

RKW Civil Suit –  Discovery phase and scheduling conference have been set. As the situation evolves, we will apprise the membership as appropriate.

Training

Take free online training NOW LiL  If you’ve got some free time on your hands and are looking for work, there’s no better time to sign up for your free LinkedIn Learning account. It’s never too late to pick up new skills that will help you find work in Live Events and Tradeshows & Conventions. Go to https://www.iatsetrainingtrust.org/lil and submit your application. You’ll have access to thousands of different courses that you can take at your own pace. The TTF AV series, Audiovisual Readiness Training for Tradeshows and much, much more are available for you for free right now. The beauty of belonging to a mixed Local is that if you have the skills and willingness, you don’t have to stick to just one craft. Take advantage of the available resources and sign up to learn new skills today! 

For anyone that has worked under the Area Standards Agreement, take your MPTV training ASAP. Go to www.iatsetrainingtrust.org/asa. Skills and Safety training are one big facet that separates us from the competition. This free distance learning training can be taken at your own pace. If you’ve got 20 or 30 minutes here or there, take some time to invest in yourself and your union.

In-person OSHA 10 GES classes will be taking place at the Hall on December 14th and 15th. Space is limited, so don’t delay in signing up. The more people that take this class, the more likely it is that we can organize venues and employers. Mahalo nui to everyone who’s going to attend the course. It’s invaluable safety training for everyone in our union and in our industry regardless of craft and sector.

Community Outreach

17th Annual LCSP Golf Tournament – On Friday November 3rd, Keoni Seabury, Sheldon Yamauchi, Willie Preston, Jon Iese, Zach Kim and I participated in the 17th Annual LCSP Golf Tournament fundraiser. It was a lively event where representatives from all across Hawai’i’s Organized Labor movement participated. Thank you to our members that signed up. We look forward to future involvement on initiatives. 100% of the proceeds from this fundraiser went to support the LCSP Hawai’i Employees Lifeline Program for Maui relief. 

DEI – I attended a Land Acknowledgement Webinar Thursday, 11/08, which outlined when it is and is not appropriate to give land acknowledgement statements, common practices, and why they’re important. The webinar was led by DEI Co-Chair and International Representative Liz Pecos. At the DEI general committee meeting on Friday, 11/17, it was discussed that the IA census had more than 50% member participation across the International and roughly 50% of Local 665 members participated as well. Thank you to everyone who filled out the census. It’s the culmination of more than two years of work for the DEI committee. The aggregated and anonymous data is currently being analyzed and a report on the IA Census will be given at the January 2024 Midwinter GEB. Local Union reports will be sent out soon after that. The participation in this initiative is above and beyond the projected levels. Your participation will directly affect how the IA advocates for you, our Local, and our brothers, sisters, and kin across the Alliance.

CHEU – On November 2nd, I met with Jon LeBlanc (Musician’s Union) and Mericia Palma Elmore (SAG-AFTRA) to touch base and get updates on current initiatives with our entertainment union ‘ohana. On November 17th, the Hawaii Film and Entertainment Board (HFEB) met at the SAG-AFTRA offices downtown. In attendance were leaders of SAG-AFTRA, American Federation of Musicians, Honolulu Film Office, Hawaii County Film Office, Irish, and I. The majority of the meeting was to discuss the SAG-AFTRA MOA summary and how it will affect our industry and our union.

Taste of Waipahu – I was invited to this event by Michael Pacheco of IBEW 1186. It took place on Saturday, November 4th in the Waipahu Don Quixote parking lot. I got to link up with who we expect to be named the next Senate Labor Chair, state Senator Henry Aquino. For all intents and purposes, he seems to be amenable to working with Labor unions toward creating a brighter future for Hawai’i. Making these connections is a vital part of not only political, but community outreach as well. We look forward to seeing how he operates as a committee chair of a subject so near and dear to our hearts.

Sunday November 12th – Pacific Producer’s Roundtable – I was invited by Kenny Burke to present at the Pacific Producer’s Roundtable event on Sunday November 12th at the Entrepreneur’s Sandbox in Kaka’ako. 44 local producers and content creators that want to legitimize their projects attended the seminar. The two-day roundtable covered several subjects ranging from how to access the film tax incentive for smaller local projects, to equipment rentals, budgeting, and engaging in business with the unions that make everything happen. I spoke with them for about an hour to give them a baseline understanding of what the IATSE is and why they shouldn’t be afraid to reach out to us. Based on follow-up surveys and reports, the organizers shared that it was incredibly well received by the attendees. By showing up to events like these, we increase our standing with the local filmmaker community and increase the likelihood of working on these shows under an agreement.

Resources – 

Application for Annuity “Special Window” – Form Fillable pdf version of the application is available at iatse665.org in the “Documents” tab under “General Information”. Please make sure to read it carefully to understand the requirements and evaluate how this will affect your tax situation.

Entertainment Community Fund Emergency Financial Assistance- https://entertainmentcommunity.org/am-i-eligible-help

Motion Picture Television Fund – https://mptf.com/services/

For those under 65, please call the intake line at 323 634 3888.

For those 65 or over, please call 323 634 3866

It was incorrectly stated at the last meeting that MPTV fund grants are only available to residents of California. This is not the case. Please read these grant pages carefully to ensure that you’ve met all the necessary requirements prior to application.

Behind the Scenes Charity Grants – https://wp.behindthescenescharity.org/apply-for-a-grant-2/

Behind the Scenes Charity Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Initiative – 

https://wp.behindthescenescharity.org/mental-health-and-suicide-prevention-initiative/

 For individuals and business owners seeking relief after the West Maui fires, for those of us in a position to donate, and for those of us that have space to help with volunteer needs, these websites may prove to be useful:

County of Maui – https://www.mauinuistrong.info/ – For volunteer efforts, donations to various on-the-ground charitable organizations, this is a hefty info hub.

 

Hawaii Community Fund – Maui Strong – https://www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org/maui-strong – This organization is working with state/county entities, NGOs, Non-profits, and community members as the situation evolves.                                                                                                                                       

Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement Kāko’o Maui Fund – https://www.hawaiiancouncil.org/helpmaui/kakoomauifund/

FEMA federal aid resources – https://www.fema.gov/disaster/4724

People’s Fund of Maui – adults who lost their primary residence in the Maui fires are eligible to receive up to $1200/month: https://www.eifoundation.org/peoples-fund-of-maui/

Read More

October 2023 President’s Report

Organizing and Political Activism

Insinuations were made at the last meeting regarding what I may have supposedly said, though the person speaking acknowledged that they had not read the report, though they were physically present at the meetings where the report was given, and though they had several opportunities to read the report of the past meeting prior to speaking about it at last month’s GMM. A very vocal minority has expressed interest in what I do with my time. This president’s report is where I tell the membership what I’m doing on a month to month basis. I encourage you to listen while I share it or, at the very least,  read this report later prior to jumping to any conclusions.

 

I attended a HI AFL-CIO talk-story session with Sen. Mazie Hirono on Thursday, October 12th. I asked about her commitment to arts funding and thoughts on creating stricter penalties or a more stringent code of ethics for the Supreme Court. She reaffirmed her commitment to funding for arts and cultural programs for all the affiliates that were present. There is appetite amongst Senate democrats for expanding the Supreme Court, but with the House of Reps in disarray, there are more emergent needs in DC at the moment.

 

Good Jobs Challenge – The Steering committee met on Thursday, September 24th for phase 2 of its mission, which involves codifying the methods with which training partnerships are established. As the training funds are federal, the channel through which they flow is the UH community college system. A few of the classes offered at UH CC are relevant to our industry, but many of our industry-standard training courses are bespoke – they were made just for entertainment technicians. So we are working on formalizing the paperwork requirements for bridging the gap between UH CC and the IATSE TTF. The program is not only designed to bring in new members of the workforce, but also to upskill current members as well. My goal is to have the GJC provide us with training space at the convention center. Once the space is secure, the training regimen that I want to establish is made up of five classes: OSHA-10 GES, Boom/Scissor/Forklift & MEWP certification, Audiovisual Readiness Training, Rigging 101, and Steward training. Members who take these courses will be hired as an “intern” for participating tradeshow companies. And the GJC will pay for the first $2000 of your wages. The next meeting of the steering committee is this Thursday, October 26th.

 

Workforce Development Council – I was asked by WDC Exec Director Bennette Misalucha to attend a visit to Maui on Wednesday, October 18th to meet with Maui Mayor Bissen. We had an opportunity to speak with Luana Mahi, Maui Economic Development Director, Leslie Wilkins, President and CEO, Maui Economic Development Board, and Chentelle Rowland, Executive Director of Maui County Workforce Development. The meeting was to discuss state and county workforce development resources that are and can be available to the people of Maui, especially those that were displaced by the wildfires. I had the opportunity to highlight the contributions of our members who contributed to the initial relief effort. I also had the opportunity to discuss with Mayor Bissen the potential for not only Film/TV work but also A/V and Live Event work for Maui, if it’s scaffolded properly. We look forward to working with Mayor Bissen and the County of Maui to support the working families of Maui in finding stable employment. 

 

Additionally, I was asked to participate in a small group of WDC members to craft the mission and vision statements for the council. It’s still in development, but it’s a more significant task than I initially realized. Once the final version is approved, it will be the “hokupa’a” for this state council for the foreseeable future. 

 

Last, but not least, I’m scheduled to present before the council in mid November to educate them on the entertainment industry in Hawaii. The powerpoint that I’ve been working on for the last month is about to see the light of day. Wish me luck. As the work continues, I look forward to reporting on this endeavor.

 

ASA Negotiations – I took an ASA Bargaining committee class on October 12th. I learned there that we need to do a lot more to include our members in this process. BA Barber will be sending out a survey soon to identify what priorities that members have for this round of bargaining. After receiving responses, I’d like to call a town hall in early November to discuss items for proposals. Personally, I’ve always found it galling that companies don’t have to pay for travel, housing, and per diem for 665 members. Ultimately, it’s important that proposals are aligned with members’ priorities. And we can’t do that without you. Proposals are due at the end of the year. I know that with a little bit of time and effort, we stagehands can do anything. Stay on the lookout for info regarding the town hall and other ASA negotiation related comms.

 

Employment opportunities – SAG-AFTRA strike is ongoing, which has drastically affected our employment levels. We are, however, a true mixed Local. Live Events and Tradeshows are still part of our wheelhouse. Encore Hawaii has several openings across the islands looking for skilled A/V technicians. If you’re looking for work in our industry, visit https://jobs.encoreglobal.com/en/location/hawaii-jobs/6228/6252001-5855797/3

If you’re looking for work, apply to Encore asap.

 

RKW and IRS –  I have been diligently compiling documents for the civil suit that was filed against us by Robin Wong. It is difficult to have to relive the trauma of this wild journey over and over again. And with every new phase, there are new requirements, hurdles, and pitfalls. Because this is a civil suit, and not a county/state/federal entity like we’ve previously dealt with, there is much more nuance involved. Compiling the miles of documents necessary to adequately defend our Local from this onslaught is much easier said than done. As time consuming as diving through our archives can be, it’s worth it. Our legal counsel, Bob Giolito, and our litigator, Leighton Hara, have been amazing to work with. We’re lucky to have them on our side.

 

Our litigator submitted a formal response to the civil suit on Friday, September 29th. Coincidentally, we received a request to review documents from the IRS to confirm our non-profit status on Monday, October 2nd. When it rains it pours. I want to take a moment to thank Shawn Christesen and Kim Tripp for their diligent work. Without them, we would be staring at a nearly insurmountable chasm. We’re on track for deadlines for both situations and will report back to members as updates emerge.

 

Training

 

Take free online training NOW LiL  If you’ve got some free time on your hands and are looking for work, there’s no better time to sign up for your free LinkedIn Learning account. It’s never too late to pick up new skills that will help you find work in Live Events and Tradeshows & Conventions. Go to https://www.iatsetrainingtrust.org/lil and submit your application. You’ll have access to thousands of different courses that you can take at your own pace. The TTF AV series, Audiovisual Readiness Training for Tradeshows and much, much more are available for you for free right now. The beauty of belonging to a mixed Local is that if you have the skills and willingness, you don’t have to stick to just one craft. Take advantage of the available resources and sign up to learn new skills today! 

 

For anyone that has worked under the Area Standards Agreement, take your MPTV training ASAP. Go to www.iatsetrainingtrust.org/asa. Skills and Safety training are one big facet that separates us from the competition. The training is free. If you’re out of work, take some time to invest in yourself and your union.

 

In-person OSHA 10 GES classes will be taking place at the Hall in mid-November and mid-December. Space is limited, so don’t delay in signing up. The more people that take this class, the more likely it is that we can organize venues and employers.

 

Community Outreach

 

Waipahu High SchoolOutreach – Thank you to Lukas Seno and Tiffany Tavares for attending on October 6th at Waipahu HS. As you can imagine, the experience was very different from the Waialua Elementary outreach opportunity. At Waialua, smaller groups of students visited our “booth” in our isolated area, whereas at Waipahu HS, there were 4 large rotations of students in a free flowing career fair. I brought my own monitor, sound bar, and laptop to show the students pertinent IA and industry videos (like the 125th anniversary vid). In the future, we should consider having a kit in a road box ready to go for events like these – monitor, audio, 665 table cloth, pens, water bottles, literature, etc – as well as a how-to guide so that anyone who wishes to can host one of these events. The next outreach opportunity is on October 25th at Kamehameha Schools Kapālama.

 

DEI – IATSE Census – The last update that we received regarding the IA Member Census is that Local 665 had more than 48% participation. Thank you to everyone who took the time to participate. We look forward to receiving and utilizing the aggregated and anonymized data to better inform us on how to represent you.

 

Interview with Local 695 – I was asked for an interview with Local 695’s quarterly magazine. We discussed, among other things, the support we received from Local 695 (a la satellite radios) for our response to the Maui wildfires. The building of inter-local solidarity is paramount to providing and receiving support in times of need. We look forward to continuing the relationships we’ve built with Locals across the Alliance.

 

Strike Resources – 

 

Entertainment Community Fund Emergency Financial Assistancehttps://entertainmentcommunity.org/am-i-eligible-help

 

Motion Picture Television Fund – https://mptf.com/services/

 

For those under 65, please call the intake line at 323 634 3888.

For those 65 or over, please call 323 634 3866

 

It was incorrectly stated at the last meeting that MPTV fund grants are only available to residents of California. This is not the case. Please read these grant pages carefully to ensure that you’ve met all the necessary requirements prior to application.

 

Behind the Scenes Charity Grants – https://wp.behindthescenescharity.org/apply-for-a-grant-2/

 

Behind the Scenes Charity Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Initiative – 

https://wp.behindthescenescharity.org/mental-health-and-suicide-prevention-initiative/

 

 For individuals and business owners seeking relief after the West Maui fires, for those of us in a position to donate, and for those of us that have space to help with volunteer needs, these websites may prove to be useful:

 

County of Maui – https://www.mauinuistrong.info/ – For volunteer efforts, donations to various on-the-ground charitable organizations, this is a hefty info hub.

 

Hawaii Community Fund – Maui Strong – https://www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org/maui-strong – This organization is working with state/county entities, NGOs, Non-profits, and community members as the situation evolves.                                                                                                                                       

Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement Kāko’o Maui Fund – https://www.hawaiiancouncil.org/helpmaui/kakoomauifund/

FEMA federal aid resources – https://www.fema.gov/disaster/4724

 

People’s Fund of Maui – adults who lost their primary residence in the Maui fires are eligible to receive up to $1200/month: https://www.eifoundation.org/peoples-fund-of-maui/

September 2023 President’s Report

Good Jobs Challenge – The first meeting of the minds for this initiative was on August 17th at Leeward CC. This is a federal workforce development plan that has allocated tens of millions of dollars to industry sectors in Hawaii. The goal of this program is to spend these funds on training programs to prepare Hawaii workers for quality jobs. GJC will pay for the trainer, the curriculum, course materials, the training facility, and will pay up to $2000 per person toward a paid internship. GJC can also pay for tools associated with the training course. They define quality jobs as having 3 qualities: living wage, benefits, and potential for upward mobility. Healthcare, Clean Energy, Tech, and Hospitality are some of the already established training programs that GJC has engaged with. There are 32 GJC programs across the US. We’re the only program with Creative Industries included. In attendance with me at this meeting were International Trustee Carlos Cota, L665 VP Lukas Seno, Sonny Julian, and Jess Cole. The administrators of this program had never heard anything in depth about our work prior to this. As a result of this meeting, they are heavily invested in learning more. I’ve been assigned to the steering committee for the GJC HI and GJC O’ahu programs. The first meeting of the steering committee is next Thursday, Sept 28th. With this program, they will pay for Live Event training and the OSHA 10 and 30 GES. If our members take these courses, you can get paid. If we take and complete these courses, the state is open to signing MOU’s for live event venues. Lukas organized a meeting with some of the DOE folks that we networked with at this event and I’ll let him speak a little about it.

 

Workforce Development Council – I volunteered for the state WDC after an AFL-CIO meeting. There was little information as to what the workload would look like and what the time commitment would be. But, it’s important for us to be at the table and be a part of the conversation when talking about federal/state monies used solely for the purpose of training workers. This council is a result of the federal Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and advises the governor on the statewide workforce development strategic plan. In early August, I took the state ethics training course and it was off to the races after that. I took a tour of the American Jobs Center near our office on Tuesday August 29th, upstairs in Dole Cannery. It’s an underutilized job center that could be a source of career pathways for the people of Hawaii. I believe there’s one on every island. We had a full Council “Retreat” on Saturday, Sept 23rd at IBEW 1186. Though “retreat” is misleading, it was a 5 hour workshop attended by all 41 members of the council – 17 from business, 8 from labor, and the remaining 16 ex-officio members from the counties and from the governor’s office. We are formulating the state’s strategic workforce development plan that’s due in March 2024. Topics of the brainstorm ranged from advocacy, to community outreach, to housing and childcare. As the work continues, I look forward to reporting on this endeavor.

 

New Mexico Film Expo – I attended the New Mexico Film Expo in late August. It was an incredible event that we need to mirror here. The expo was attended by around 4000 people, including the mayor of Albuquerque, the lieutenant governor, the NM District Attorney, and the chair of the Democratic party of New Mexico. It started with a queue towards a stage door. The audience filed into a viewing area of a fully dressed interior set about the size of our main hall. They were immediately behind video village and all aspects of the industry were on display – a fisher 10 with an aero jib arm, s60’s and other lighting panels, an actor dressed up as an alien, special effects pumping steam out of the engine of a car, 1940’s wardrobe, a little bit of stunts. The scene was also written by a WGA member. SAG-AFTRA actors participated in the volunteer effort. It was a tightly knitted vignette of our world on display for the community and for elected leaders. The exit led to production photos and specs, then to the prop truck, then to a tent where every craft had a booth to explain what they do. From there, the attendees had a few options – check out the giant tent with all of the educational opportunities, get food from the food trucks on the road, or check out the vendors. Of the vendors there, Pursuit camera cars, ProCam, Elation Lighting, Quixote with their green energy trailers, Cinelease, Universal, Prop shops, animal wranglers, Green energy generators, and much much more. This event has gone a long way toward educating the people of NM and their elected officials about the film/tv industry, the workers who encompass the industry, and the economic impact on the state. I shared this info at the most recent HFEB meeting and they seem really excited for the opportunity to mirror this event to educate lawmakers ahead of the next legislative session.

 

I also got a chance to tour their studio facilities and was shocked to learn that, even with their $1.5B economic impact to the state, that only 2 of their studios – Netflix and Santa Fe studios – are purpose-built. Everything else is a retrofitted building. Across 6 hours we toured 8 spaces from Albuquerque to Santa Fe. The most impressive of which was Cinelease studios. They took an old semiconductor factory and turned it into a studio with 4 stages – each with a footprint of 29,000 sq ft. We didn’t get a chance to visit Las Cruces, but what we saw was eye opening. We hope to partner with folks like Cinelease to retrofit a building out here. While they are obviously pausing new projects due to the ongoing strikes, what they’ve done is impressive.

 

GEB Chicago – Following the D2 convention earlier this year, I was asked by the IATSE Political/Legislative department to record a video for the National AFL-CIO endorsement event of the Biden/Harris administration. I didn’t expect it, but the video was played for the assembled leaders. The DEI committee report was well received. The DEI luncheon was the most attended event we’ve ever had. And the DEI solidarity event was so packed, an empty restaurant became standing room only in a matter of minutes. I was invited to a meeting of large stage locals by Int’l VP Barnes, though this is not to mean that we’re creating another Stage Caucus. It was really just 15 minutes to exchange contact information. Local 665 is continuously spotlighted at these events. These inter-local partnerships are crucial to our continued success.

 

Working Families Caucus – Rep Jeanne Kapela 09/18/2023 SNAP benefits and food availability for the food insecure. This informational session highlighted several Hawaii residents that are currently experiencing food insecurity and the hurdles they face trying to feed their families. Our hope is to remove the barriers to food access and increase food support for the people of Hawaii based on what we heard at this meeting.

 

Waialua Elementary Outreach – with Connie Alcinio, Hanna Geraghty, Bala, Kelly Kraynek. It was a fun opportunity to meet with students grade 4-6 to show them what we do and engage them in hidden career pathways. The next outreach opportunity is October 6th at Waipahu HS. Anyone, especially with ties to Waipahu HS, is encouraged to volunteer in this classroom presentation setting. We have space for two or three more volunteers.  

 

Maui member spotlight – Thank you Joe Arias, Mike Carreno, Dave Reyes, Dave Dahlberg, Mike Anderson, Kaipu Seales, Kahi Logan, Victor Lozano, Local 1, Local 2, Local 52, Local 74, Local 600, W-D T-S fund, International President Loeb and the Disaster response committee for their help. Local 695 for Satellite Radios that really helped in the early days

 

Maui Ola – good fun to get motor grease on my hands again.Thank you to everyone from 665 who volunteered. The event raised over $1m in aid for Maui.

 

 For individuals and business owners seeking relief after the West Maui fires, for those of us in a position to donate, and for those of us that have space to help with volunteer needs, these websites may prove to be useful:

 

County of Maui – https://www.mauinuistrong.info/ – For volunteer efforts, donations to various on-the-ground charitable organizations, this is a hefty info hub.

 

Hawaii Community Fund – Maui Strong – https://www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org/maui-strong – This organization is working with state/county entities, NGOs, Non-profits, and community members as the situation evolves.                                                                                                                                       

Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement Kāko’o Maui Fund – https://www.hawaiiancouncil.org/helpmaui/kakoomauifund/

FEMA federal aid resources – https://www.fema.gov/disaster/4724

 

People’s Fund of Maui – adults who lost their primary residence in the Maui fires are eligible to receive up to $1200/month: https://www.eifoundation.org/peoples-fund-of-maui/

 

Locals that donated funds to Maui Relief – Local 1, Local 2, Local 52, Local 74, Local 80, Local 600, International President Loeb, the Walsh-Di Tolla-Spivak disaster relief fund

 

Support from Local 695 – donated satellite radios that were integral in the initial response. Communications before arms in all things.

International Disaster Response Committee coordinated response/relief effort

 

Employment opportunities –  The WGA and SAG-AFTRA strikes are ongoing, which has drastically affected our employment levels. We are, however, a true mixed Local. Live Events and Tradeshows are still part of our wheelhouse. Encore Hawaii has several openings across the islands looking for skilled A/V technicians. If you’re looking for work in our industry, visit https://jobs.encoreglobal.com/en/location/hawaii-jobs/6228/6252001-5855797/3

If you’re looking for work, apply to Encore asap.

 

DEI – IATSE Census – It’s the culmination of several years of work. Initially, the DEI committee was told the best we could hope for across the IA was 10-12% participation. Our Local has been really active 42%. Thank you to everyone who participated. We’ll be receiving results soon. 51% of the International has participated so far. The census will conclude at the end of this month.

 

Take free online training NOW LiL  If you’ve got some free time on your hands and are looking for work, there’s no better time to sign up for your free LinkedIn Learning account. It’s never too late to pick up new skills that will help you find work in Live Events and Tradeshows & Conventions. Go to https://www.iatsetrainingtrust.org/lil and submit your application. You’ll have access to thousands of different courses that you can take at your own pace. The TTF AV series, Audiovisual Readiness Training for Tradeshows and much, much more are available for you for free right now. The beauty of belonging to a mixed Local is that if you have the skills and willingness, you don’t have to stick to just one craft. Take advantage of the available resources and sign up to learn new skills today! 

 

Strike Resources – 

 

Entertainment Community Fund Emergency Financial Assistancehttps://entertainmentcommunity.org/am-i-eligible-help

 

Motion Picture Television Fund – https://mptf.com/services/

 

For those under 65, please call the intake line at 323 634 3888.

For those 65 or over, please call 323 634 3866

 

Behind the Scenes Charity Grants – https://wp.behindthescenescharity.org/apply-for-a-grant-2/

 

Behind the Scenes Charity Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Initiative – 

https://wp.behindthescenescharity.org/mental-health-and-suicide-prevention-initiative/

July 2023 President’s Report

Organizing and Political Activism

 

SAG-AFTRA rally I was invited to speak at the rally on Tuesday July 18th at the capitol. Additionally speaking at the event were State Rep Della Au Bellati, State Senator Sharon Moriwaki, as well as Vanessa Lachey and the cast of NCIS: Hawaii. Wed, July 19th canceled due to Tropical Storm Calvin. Special shoutout to Brian Gilhooly, Patrick Jeppeson, and Jeremy LeCain for showing up and showing support. Future events will be announced, please come out to these events to support our union ohana and wear an IA shirt. It not only amplifies the message and increases visibility for their plight, it sends a strong message to the employers, legislators, and community members that we stand together. Should a picket line show up in front of a worksite, please do not walk the line unless you’re a member of SAG-AFTRA or WGA. The rally had around 100 attendees, but we can help boost those numbers. For anyone that’s been looking for a way to get involved, show up to the rallies/events in an IA shirt to show solidarity with our entertainment industry union ‘ohana.

 

NEXT SAG-AFTRA EVENT – Aug. 04, 2023 – 10:00 AM to 10:30 AM HT

 

Where: Kualoa Regional Park – looking towards Mokoli’i

 

NEW DATE: Hawaii members will assemble in support of the SAG-AFTRA TV/Theatrical/Streaming Strike at Kualoa Regional Park – meet at the first parking area looking towards Mokoli’i at 10 am. on Friday, Aug. 4, 2023. We will take a quick photo together in solidarity! SAG-AFTRA Strong T-Shirts and Signs will be provided (while supplies last).

 

If you can make this event, please wear an IA 665 shirt and register at https://www.sagaftra.org/hawaii-sag-aftra-tvtheatricalstreaming-strike-support-kualoa-regional-park. Members on the windward side, it’s in your backyard. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to support the cause. Please add to the conversation on social media using #SAGAFTRAstrong and #SAGAFTRAstrike.

 

HI AFL-CIO EB meeting – WGA member Aaron Kandell presented to the State Fed Executive Board Thursday, July 20th. He, alongside HI SAG-AFTRA director Mericia Palma Elmore and I, got a chance to educate the affiliate unions on the challenges that face entertainment workers and the ways in which they can support us – by donating to the appropriate mutual aid partnerships, showing up to solidarity events, and amplifying the message by sharing stories on social media. For more information, go to https://www.sagaftrastrike.org/ and https://www.wgacontract2023.org/

 

WDC – Mtg with leadership on Friday 07/21 to discuss a presentation I’ve been tasked with creating for the full council on the positive economic impacts of our industry as well as challenges we’ve been facing. When I walk the capitol during legislative session, it often comes as a shock to folks that we do more than Film and TV.  It’s a significant opportunity to educate the various stakeholders in county/state government as well as those in workforce development. Additionally, I’ve been scheduled for state ethics training on September 9th, 2023.

 

If you are in need of emergency financial assistance, go to the Motion Picture and Television Fund – https://mptf.com/services/

 

You can also visit the Entertainment Community Fund – entertainmentcommunityfund.org and click on the “Services & Programs” tab

 

If you’re looking for resources regarding therapy or substance abuse rehabilitation, go to https://wp.behindthescenescharity.org/

 

Training 

 

As technicians, some of the most stressful times are when we’re waiting with nothing to do. While we await the results of the WGA and SAG-AFTRA strikes, let’s use some of this time for honing our crafts through safety and skills training

LinkedIn Learning – Through this subscription, active IATSE members and those working under IATSE agreements will have unlimited access to the LinkedIn Learning online library of high-quality, instructional videos across a wide spectrum of technologies. LinkedIn Learning is designed for all levels of learners with courses taught by recognized industry experts, and it’s available whenever you’re ready to learn. There is no cost to join. Do not delay in applying for LinkedIn Learning. To apply, go to: https://www.iatsetrainingtrust.org/lil,

Download the application and email it to the address listed on the page.

 

Once you’ve received your log-in for LinkedIn Learning, check out the TTF AV Video series – https://www.iatsetrainingtrust.org/news/2023/3/13/av-video-series

MP/TV Training (Area Standards Agreement) – Everybody deserves to feel safe and secure at work. When IATSE workers know the basics of workplace health and safety, we can help to prevent accidents, injuries, and illnesses on the job. These online trainings include the “A” – General Safety Training, “A2” – Environmental Safety, and “HP1” – Harassment Prevention 1 or “HP2” – Harassment Prevention 2 Safety Pass online courses developed by Contract Services. These courses are only available to those performing work under the IATSE Area Standards Agreement. https://www.iatsetrainingtrust.org/asa

 

IATSE TTF Safety First! Courses – Learn at your own pace in these vital safety awareness courses https://www.iatsetrainingtrust.org/safetyfirst/

Local 665 – We are actively planning for in-person training opportunities in mid to late August. Stay tuned for announcements.

If you need help accessing the online training programs offered by IATSE TTF or through LinkedIn Learning, which has thousands of courses from soft skills like how to be an effective emerging leader to hard skills like cybersecurity, is available to members at no charge. Or if you have a suggestion for training that could benefit a group of our members, please send an email to president@iatse665.org and I’ll do my best to guide you through it.

 

Good Jobs Challenge – I was contacted by DBEDT and Revitalize Hawaii regarding an exciting opportunity. This is where the rubber meets the road for the GJC. This initiative could provide funds for upskilling training via IA training and PAYING folks to train as well as organizing public live event venues. My first meeting with them is next Tuesday with another on August 17th. This would mean that members could get paid to take industry specific training during the strikes.

 

Outreach

 

Kona Studio trip – I was invited by the developer to tour the studio in development. I flew to Kona on the morning of Friday, July 14th and returned that evening. Additionally attending this tour was Hawaii County Film Commissioner Aulani Freitas. To put it in perspective, Pinewood Studios in London is approx 59,000 sq ft. The footprint of this proposed film studio is 125,000 sq ft. It does need work. It’s a gutted KMart, the ceilings are low. But it has immense potential for training opportunities, controlled exterior VFX sets, and more opportunities to hold training for not only our workers, but for the extended labor community of Hawaii island.

 

DEI – Joint DEI committee ASA review of proposals Wed 07/19 – Leaders and representatives of ASA Locals reviewed the employer proposal regarding the DEI internship program in the ASA. We compiled our proposals on a shared document and I’m proud to say that many of the adjustments that I recommended were supported by other Local leaders in attendance. Counter-proposal adjustments that I recommended included limiting the amount of hours that an intern could work in a day, providing protections for these workers (as the employer did not want to recognize them as “employees”), assigning an additional crew member to supervise/mentor an intern so as not to impede on a fully staffed crew, and ensuring that career pathways for these interns stay within the realm of control of the Local and not the employer. These interns are folks from underrepresented/historically excluded communities that may be interested in becoming involved in our industries, but don’t know where to start.   

 

Executive Committee meeting & General Committee Meeting Friday, 07/21/2023

 

The bulk of the committee’s work has been dedicated to the launch of the census since April. 

 

Relaunch of IATSE census – this has been a process of at least 18 years starting in 2005 as departments and committees have been added – Education and Training department was established in 2010 along with the Four Pillars – Leadership, Skills & Safety, Activism, Communication, the 2013 Quadrennial Convention established the Young Workers Committee, Women’s Committee was established in 2015, Pride committee created at the 2017 Quadrennial Convention “Growth Equals Strength”, 2021 convention “Census” resolution 18 passed overwhelmingly. It mandated, by convention action, that the IA count who we are. It was originally tasked to Locals, but they had various issues. It was then tasked to the reconstituted DEI committee.Census info can be used for organizing, negotiations, education, outreach, and more. Knowing the makeup of our members will help us craft pol/leg strategy (i.e. tax incentives for film/tv and/or stagecraft). Cornell ILR worker institute was chosen to conduct the census.

 

The launch of the census was on July 10th. Several technical glitches were discovered. It has been relaunched and is open for every IA member to take this census. You may only take the census once, even if you have more than one IA card. Retirees are eligible to participate. Those who have been expelled or are not yet members are not eligible. If you experience an issue, fill out your information in the “contact us” tab https://www.ilr.cornell.edu/worker-institute/iatse-census/contact-us

 

How to take the Census

 

  • Click the link in the email you receive  
  • QR code

 

 

The 2023 IATSE Member Census is a critical initiative to gain accurate, anonymized, aggregated, and up to date statistics regarding our membership across the United States and Canada – all answers are confidential. The insights gained from the Member Census will be used to empower us to better advocate for our members’ rights and interests, and ensure future actions reflect the union’s membership.The average completion time is 5 min. At present, 10% of members across the Alliance have completed the Please take a few minutes to complete this important survey.

 

Rough timeline:

 

September 2023 – census closes

Jan 2024 – census results announced and shared with Locals

Feb 2024 – census results will be shared with individual Locals

 

Hurricane season began on June 1st and runs through November 30th. Though the last few hurricane seasons have come and gone without much ruckus, I urge you to make preparations for potential inclement weather. Better to have made preparations and not need them, then to need them and not have made them. Emergency provisions include, among other things, 1 gallon of water per person per day, non-perishable food, medications, personal sanitation, clothes, and bedding. It may also be prudent to secure non-electrical means of cooking, if you’re able. Attached, you’ll find the Hawaiian Electric Handbook for Emergency Preparedness. It can also be found in multiple languages on their website https://www.hawaiianelectric.com/safety-and-outages/storm-center/emergency-preparedness-handbook. Below are some resources that may prove useful:

NOAA Tsunami Evac Zones: https://tsunami.coast.noaa.gov/

State of Hawai’i HI-EMA: https://dod.hawaii.gov/hiema/get-ready/

 Hawai’i County Civil Defense website: https://hawaii-county-civil-defense-agency-hawaiicountygis.hub.arcgis.com/

Maui County Emergency Management Agency: https://www.mauicounty.gov/70/Emergency-Management-Agency

City and County of Honolulu Dept of Emergency Management: https://www.honolulu.gov/dem

Oahu Hurricane Shelters: https://www.hero.radio/map-of-oahu-hurricane-shelters

 Kaua’i Emergency Management Agency: https://www.kauai.gov/Government/Departments-Agencies/Emergency-Management-Agency

In closing, We haven’t had a chance to get to Good and Welfare in the past few meetings, so I’d like to report on it here – I’m sure that you’ve all heard about the tragic killing of Kono Dahlin. He was a wonderful man who was taken from us too soon. We are following the situation closely and will provide updates as we receive them. Information on his celebration of life will also be shared as we receive it. 

June 2023 President’s Report

First and foremost, a heartfelt mahalo to all of the well-wishers and good vibes from those that have reached out. On the evening of Wednesday, May 17th, my family welcomed our new baby, Len Scanlan, into the world. Jackie has recovered well and Sonia is the best big sister that I could hope for. I took the following 7 business days off for personal leave. On Monday, June 29th, I hopped back in the saddle. Certainly not enough time to truly support my wife through her recovery, but we made it work. Rather than break this report up into the various sections, it will be read as a timeline, as the Venn diagram of the items reported overlap.

 

June 1st – Sector Strategies and Career Pathways Committee Meeting presentation at DLIR – 

 

I first met Cary Miyashiro at L665’s career pathways booth for the Hawai’i AFL-CIO’s Labor of Love event at Dole Middle School. Cary is in his second year of a four year term on the state Workforce Development Council. He was intrigued by our industry and, much like many of the civilians looking in from the outside, had little knowledge of what it is that our union actually does. Consistent with a number of state entities, they only hear about us during the legislative session when we provide testimony in support of the film tax incentive. We spoke about live events, career pathways, and how to involve the community in our industry. As a result of this conversation, I was invited to the Sector Strategies and Career Pathways Committee meeting on June 1st at the DLIR offices. Various public sector unions presented the work that they’ve accomplished through programs catered to underserved communities. Many expressed a need to find accessible career pathways for their respective groups. I shared briefly about the scope of our work and available training opportunities. Doors have opened as a result. We were invited to visit the Boys and Girls Club of Hawaii’s NFL YET Center in Nanakuli (more on that in a bit). I will be reaching out to ‘Olelo next week to discuss how we can be of service to one another. Among the attendees were State Sen. Bennette Misalucha. I was officially appointed in the interim by Gov. Green to the state’s WDC on June 18th.

 

June 6th-11th – Airport pickups, District 2 Convention – Invocation, Mayor Blangiardi, Resolutions Committee 2 Chair, HIFA at Reception

 

On June 6th, Shawn Christensen, Irish Barber and I had an informal meeting with D2 Secretary-Treasurer Anthony Pawluc and Encore reps. Prior to the birth of my son, we were told that Anthony and Irish would have a discussion with Encore regarding technicians for the District Convention. We were under the assumption that technicians for the reception would also be discussed, but no such discussion occurred. While on family leave, I was unable to attend the follow up meeting. On June 6th, we realized that no technicians were scheduled for Saturday, June 10th. Shawn and I then moved quickly to fill the gaps. Many thanks to Lukas Seno and Kaimana Young for being so quick to respond to our call for aid. As a result, the reception was a resounding success. I picked up International VPs Mike Miller and Thom Davis from the airport on Thursday and I was informed that I was requested to give the invocation for the convention. I picked up International President Loeb from the airport on Friday when I checked in. Friday evening, I was told that I’d be sitting up on the dais with the District chairs and the International President at convention call on Saturday morning. It left little time to prepare, but based on all accounts, it was well received. I was tasked with chairing the Resolutions 2 committee. One contentious resolution went through significant debate, but was ultimately voted down. Aside from that, the convention was rather swift.

 

I invited two representatives from HIFA to the reception so that international representatives could become familiar with not only their faces, but their plight as well. I was called away early Sunday morning to the ER, as my son was in need of emergency medical attention. All is well now, but that’s not the call any parent wants to receive at 12:30 am.

 

A sincere mahalo to all of the volunteer Sergeants-at-Arms. We couldn’t have done it without you. Stay tuned for another opportunity to be a part of the process for the Quadrennial Convention in 2025.

 

June 13th – I was asked by the IA Pol/Leg Department director Tyler McIntosh to record a video for the Nat’l AFL-CIO rally in Philadelphia on Father’s day weekend. Each affiliate was asked to record a video of their International/National President/Director as well as a member in support of the Biden-Harris administration’s strong stance toward Labor. I was given boilerplate language to shape into my own words. Even though the video was only 90 seconds long, as anyone behind the scenes can tell you, 90 seconds of recorded run time can take a lifetime to record. I’m honored that Tyler thought of me. I’ll be working with Pol/Leg to pressure Customs and Border Patrol to re-open the HIFA Visa waiver program, as local efforts to sway them have stalled.

 

Friday, June 16th – I was invited by the Hawaii State AFL-CIO to play on their team at the 3rd annual Mariano-Soquena Golf tournament at Pearl Country Club. I played alongside Dion Dizon (formerly of the state fed’s COPE, and now with IBEW 1186), Lisa Marie Akau, who represents TSA workers, and 3 members of IBEW 1260. I cannot express how important these events are. It was a who’s-who of Labor leaders both in the public and private sectors. The outreach capable as a result of candid audience time with allies in Hawai’i’s organized labor movement cannot be understated. 

 

June 21st – Dave Wallace, Willie Preston, Irish Barber, Shawn Christensen, and I did a walkthrough of the Kaneohe Bayview Golf Course, Driving Range, Mini-golf, and banquet facility to scout a family friendly member golf event to be held on Saturday, August 19th, 2023. All members and their families are welcome. 

 

June 22nd – Outreach at NFL YET facility in Nanakuli (bc of June 1st and Labor of Love), Film Studio near ACM Pre-proposal conference, Property Walkthrough

 

Lukas Seno and I spent the day doing outreach on the Westside of O’ahu – a singularly underserved community. We visited the Boys and Girls Club of Hawai’i’s NFL YET (Youth Education Town) center in Nanakuli. We got an opportunity to see their media center, which, while slightly outdated, has a lot of potential to propel the youth of Nanakuli into viable careers in our industry if we can empower volunteer technicians to share their skill sets with the youth. We attended the pre-proposal conference for the ISP issued by the University of Hawaii system for a studio in West O’ahu. The timeline seems rather rushed, but I believe UH is trying to get the ball rolling prior to the beginning of the next legislative session. The conference was held on Zoom and was attended by several developers. We then went on a walkthrough of the ACM facility and a site inspection of the property. Developers had concerns regarding available workforce, but we were able to quell their concerns.

 

We had an opportunity to check out their “maker space” – CNC Router, Laser Cutter, and 3D printer. Joe Martinez of Local 44, is a certified armorer, Pyrotechnician (3rd class) and prop shop.  With his team, Andy and Nate, they can take a concept from cocktail napkin to set-ready prop. They are currently working in the prop shop for Lilo and Stitch, have offered to run a training course on the use of CNC routers and Laser cutters for fabrication. This would be an advanced course for our more experienced prop-makers. Training on emerging technology and techniques will keep us at the forefront of the industry. Joe and his team are the first and only prop shop in existence. If we can train our members here in prop shop, it could change the face of our industry as we know it. We’d no longer have to outsource this work to the continent. That being said, it would be cost-prohibitive if we had to pay to ship their machines from LA to here. And that’s where ACM’s maker space comes into play. I’m sure everyone here can see the value in having a push-button ready facility available to us for training purposes. We hope to tour the facility with Joe and his team next Friday.

 

Tues June 27th – state senators have invited me to partake in discussions with WGA members in Hawaii to explore the potential impact on our industry. They have intentionally kept the group small, so I will report the results of the conversation to the board and membership when it makes sense.

 

Thursday, June 29th – 1st official meeting as a Governor appointed member of the Hawaii Workforce Development Council at DLIR. Several council members are slated to retire. So this is not only an inaugural meeting for the new members of the WDC, but also a farewell.

 

IATSE 2023 Member Census opens July 10th Guide

 

The 2023 IATSE Member Census is a critical initiative to gain accurate, anonymized, aggregated, and up to date statistics regarding our membership across the United States and Canada.

The insights gained from the Member Census will be used to empower us to better advocate for our members’ rights and interests, and ensure future actions reflect the union’s membership.”

 

The following training courses are available and useful to all members, regardless of craft:

 

IA TTF Safety First! Courses can be found at:https://www.iatsetrainingtrust.org/safetyfirst

 

Motion Picture/TV training is also available at https://www.iatsetrainingtrust.org/asa – Safety A, A2, and Harassment Prevention, and C19 Prevention Training

 

If you need help accessing the online training programs offered by IATSE TTF or through LinkedIn Learning, which has thousands of courses from soft skills like how to be an effective emerging leader to hard skills like cybersecurity, is available to members at no charge. Or if you have a suggestion for training that could benefit a group of our members, please send an email to president@iatse665.org and I’ll do my best to guide you through it.

 

With the Writers strike in effect and a potential SAG-AFTRA strike on the horizon, I implore you to take advantage of training opportunities. If work should shut down, we will be ramping up training opportunities for members. It will strengthen our Local, our Union, and will help us get you more work. 

WGA Strike

Aloha kakou,

 

As I’m sure you’re all aware, the Writers Guild of America (WGA) went out on strike as of 12:01 am ET Tuesday, May 2nd, 2023 (6:01 pm HST Monday, 05/01/23). Anyone working under the ASA is expressly granted the right to honor any lawful picket line. If there is no picket line at your work site, you may report to work as you normally do. At the time of writing, there are no picket lines scheduled for entertainment industry work sites in Hawai’i that I am aware of. An updated WGA picket schedule can be found here (or copy and paste this link in your browser: wgacontract2023.org/strike/picket-schedules-and-locations)

 

We will be closely monitoring the situation on our end, but you’re our boots on the ground. If you report to work and find that a picket line has been established, please contact me or the Hall as soon as possible with the address, employer, and specific entrance of the facility/worksite (it’s weird, I know, but it matters) so that we can confirm its legitimacy and spread the word. Should you encounter a picket line on one of our worksites, I encourage you to honor it by not crossing. It’s the same support that we would ask of other entertainment unions if we were in their position. I’m coordinating with Teamsters 996 and SAG-AFTRA to share information among Hawai’i entertainment unions regarding the WGA strike. As updates are received on our end, we’ll get them to you as soon as possible.

 

Additionally, should you encounter a lawful picket line at work, it is very important that you contact your supervisor and inform them that you’ll be exercising your contractual right to honor a picket line. In addition to a phone call, email your supervisor with the subject line “_____ Strike at our worksite” and Cc documents@iatse665.org. This way, there will be documentation that you alerted your supervisor. If you do not do these things, it could be considered a no call/no show, which could result in termination.

In Solidarity,

 

Tuia’ana Scanlan

President, IATSE Local 665

he/him/his

President’s Report – January 2021

Organizing and Political Activism – 

Several meetings with fellow labor coalitions have occurred over the course of this last month. The Hawaii Labor Coalition continues to meet regularly to advance the goals of the labor movement and labor-friendly legislation. As the Legislative session has convened, we have been meeting more frequently.

This Legislature is only accepting testimony electronically. The rules for testimony vary slightly between the State House Committees and the State Senate Committees. Legislative Calendars, State Committee assignments, Remote Testimony Procedures, and other pertinent information is available on our website under the “Documents” tab. Make sure to register an account at capitol.hawaii.gov as it’s necessary to submit testimony for any bill. No in-person testimony will be permitted at the State Capitol or County Councils.

Training and Development –

I’ve continued to take leadership classes including Foundations of Union Leadership and the “Mental Health Issues and the Union” Webinar. Further info on training will be shared during the Training Committee’s report

Outreach –

DEI Committee – A report has been submitted for the 2021 mid-winter General Executive Board meeting, which will be held electronically next week Tuesday and Wednesday, January 26th and 27th from 6:00am – 12:00pm HST each day. The work of the committee continues. The next meeting of the DEI committee is today – Executive Committee at 12pm HST and full committee meeting at 2pm

Contract Negotiation – 

Lastly, in an effort to put our unique skills sets to good use for the public good in a mutually beneficial endeavor, we’ll be reaching out to politicians, live event venues, and promoters.
Based on the executive orders that President Joe Biden has signed to combat the COVID-19 pandemic, Int’l President Loeb has advised IATSE Stagecraft locals to coordinate with employers to lobby their State and Local Governments to turn IATSE venues into COVID Vaccination sites/field hospitals.

 

President’s Report – December 2020

Organizing activities and Political activism – 

 

Hawaii Labor Coalition – Virtual meetings regarding legislative priorities spanning across the labor movement from County to Federal level

 

Political Action Committee – 

 

Set Teacher’s Bill – 

 

Prompt Payment Statutes – 

 

Training and Professional development – 

 

COVID-19 Prevention Training – I’ve received a number of questions regarding access to the required training. I know that many of you are looking to be compliant, but have experienced trouble connecting to the CSATF portal. It’s important to note that “TTF Safety First! Online Courses” does NOT contain the correct course. Check your inbox for an email sent by BA Barber on 10/21/2020 entitled “REQUIRED NEW IATSE COVID-19 TTF Course”. Follow the instructions and you should receive your PIN soon. Make sure to register your account as you receive it. If you’ve already done that, but have yet to receive your PIN, go to iatsetrainingtrust.org/c19 and click “Contact Us”. Or reach out directly by sending an email to safety@iatsetrainingtrust.org.

That being said, check out “TTF Safety First!”. It’s got a bunch of useful information that help to promote safety at the work site.

Mental Health in the time of COVID-19 – an 8hour class that was held 5am-1pm HST on Friday, December 4th from “Lankey and Limey LLC” – 

Outreach – 

Academy of Creative Media at UH West Oahu – HFEB members were invited to tour the facility as it develops. It’s a fun, tech-centric space that lends itself to emerging media like E-Sports. I don’t think they’ve allocated enough space for pre-production (i.e. mill, wardrobe, G&E, etc) but it looks like somewhere that we could train the next generation of stagehands.

DEI Committee – We’ve met more often this month than ever before. A lot of energy has been focused on organizing internally and strategizing how our work can be implemented for the betterment of the spectrum from individual members to the industry at large. This includes, but is not limited to: gender inclusive policy and procedural language, training and development, recognition and promotion of BIPOC/underrepresented communities in ad campaigns. We will be submitting a report for the 2021 mid-winter General Executive Board meeting.

 

IATSE665

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